Corneal inlays may remove need for reading glasses

Implantable eye devices called corneal inlays are designed to correct presbyopia – the age-related loss of near vision that affects over a billion people worldwide. Delegates at a recent scientific meeting learned how one such device – the KAMRA inlay – improved near vision well enough for 80% of study participants to be able to read a newspaper without impairing far distance vision for common activities such as driving.

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Discovery of a new mechanism that can lead to blindness

An important scientific breakthrough by a team of IRCM researchers led by Michel Cayouette, PhD, is being published today by The Journal of Neuroscience. The Montréal scientists discovered that a protein found in the retina plays an essential role in the function and survival of light-sensing cells that are required for vision. These findings could have a significant impact on our understanding of retinal degenerative diseases that cause blindness. Continue reading

A Guide To Leave Part 2

In this part, we will cover sick leave, maternity leave as well as family responsibility leave.
BACKGROUND
The Basic Conditions of Employment Act applies to all employers and workers, but not to
members of the National Defence Force, National Intelligence Agency, South African
Secret Service or unpaid volunteers working for charity.
The provisions for sick leave do not apply to workers who work less than 24 hours a month,
workers who receive compensation for an occupational injury or disease or leave over and
above that provided for by the Act.

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A Guide To Leave

BACKGROUND
The Basic Conditions of Employment Act (BCEA) applies to all employers and workers, but not to
members of the National Defence Force, National Intelligence Agency, South African Secret
Service or unpaid volunteers working for charity.
The BCEA regulates leave, working hours, employment contracts, deductions, pay slips and
termination.
The section of the Act that regulates working hours does not apply to workers in senior
management, sales staff who travel and regulate their own working hours, workers who work less
than 24 hours in a month, workers who earn in excess of an amount stated in terms of section 6 (3)
of the Act or workers engaged in emergency work who are excluded from certain provisions.
Basic Conditions of Employment legislation requires that workers get a minimum of 21 consecutive
days of annual leave each year.
The provisions for annual leave do not apply to workers who work less than 24 hours a month or to
leave over and above that provided for by the Act.
TYPES OF LEAVE
Various types of leave exist. Each will be explained separately.
1. Annual Leave
2. Sick Leave
3. Maternity Leave
4. Family responsibility Leave
5. Religious Holidays
6. Study Leave
7. Other types of Leave

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Rape not an inherent risk of employment – SCA rules that MEC liable for damages after doctor’s ordeal By Johan Botes, Director- Employment Law, Cliffe Dekker Hofmeyr

An employee, who suffered the horrendous ordeal of being raped whilst on duty, is not precluded from suing her employer for damages. This is according to Johan Botes, Director in the Employment practice at Cliffe Dekker Hofmeyr, who explained that the Supreme Court of Appeal (SCA), handed down judgment on 8 October 2014 which stated that the employer (the MEC for the Department of Health, Free State Province) did not escape liability for damages by relying on the Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Act, (COIDA). While the Compensation Commissioner stands in the shoes of the employer for claims in terms damages by an employee in terms of COIDA, that Act does not relate to claims that are unrelated to the employee’s employment with the employer.

“The SCA confirmed that the statutory regime dealing with claims by employees for accidents in the workplace are governed by the provisions of COIDA. That Act aims to create a framework whereby employees could recover damages from their employer where they had an accident in the workplace. The employees are thus able to obtain relief without expensive litigation. In addition, the employees are able to obtain compensation from the Compensation Commissioner, including loss of future earnings, where the employer may not have been able to satisfy such a claim due to the significant financial burden such payment may represent to an employer,” Botes noted. Continue reading